Discern When To Voice Our Insecurities

One attribute of love is being considerate of others, even in the midst of our own insecurities.

 

There are times when it’s appropriate to share our insecurities with someone, but there are also times when it is best to keep our thoughts to ourselves. Here is an example of when it’s best to keep silent.

 

I have never particularly enjoyed cooking. It is more of a necessity than a pleasure for me. In 1991, we had a foreign exchange student, Vinnie, staying with us. I was at the sink after dinner and my husband, Tom, and Vinnie were still at the table. Tom asked Vinnie if his mom was a good cook, and he said yes. I should have stayed out of the conversation, but I said, “Oh dear” and then said something about my lack of skill. Tom said, “You do all right.” Then, thankfully, he added humor and said, “This pizza you ordered is great.” I said, “Yes, that’s my kind of cooking” and the topic changed.

 

Later it occurred to me that part of my job as a hostess is to make my guest feel comfortable. I needn’t make derogatory remarks about my inadequacies. That doesn’t glorify God. Instead, I should do my best, and trust God to make up for the gaps in my abilities. Love always focuses more on the other person’s needs than on my own.

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